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Wood

How To Protect Bottom Of Wood Fence

How To Protect Bottom Of Wood Fence

Between the rain, wind and cold temperatures, winter can be hard on a How To Protect Bottom Of Wood Fence. Spending time outdoors may be the last thing most homeowners want to do this time of year, but a little extra maintenance now can help increase the life span of your fence and reduce the problems you’ll encounter come spring.

What Winter Weather Does to a Wood Fence

While heat and sunlight are generally the biggest culprits when it comes to How To Protect Bottom Of Wood Fence damage, winter’s unrelenting moisture and shifting temperatures can also cause problems. Here’s a look at how winter weather affects your fencing materials:

Rain and snow. Prolonged exposure to moisture weakens the fibers of a Styles Of Wood Fences and opens the door for mold, mildew and rot. A waterproof stain or sealant is your best defense against the rain. It’s also important to keep leaves and other organic matter from becoming wedged between fence boards, as this inhibits air flow and creates a trap for moisture.

Changing temperatures. Shifts in temperature cause the wood to expand and contract, which can cause knots to fall out and leave knotholes in your fence. If left unaddressed, knotholes can invite rot and pests to infest your fence.

Winter Fence Maintenance Tips

Shifting soil. Heavy precipitation can cause water to soak into the soil and form sinkholes, landslides and shifts that could impact your fence’s supporting posts. Keep an eye on your How To Protect Bottom Of Wood Fence posts throughout the winter to ensure they remain straight, strong and rot-free.

Falling debris. Overhanging tree limbs can break under the weight of snow and ice, causing damage to your fence on their way to the ground. Monitor any trees within falling distance of your fence, and trim back any branches that pose a threat.

Winter Maintenance Tips for Wood Fences

Applying a quality fence stain before winter is your first line of defense against seasonal damage. However, there are a few steps you should take throughout the winter months to ensure the ongoing health of your fence:
— Inspect your wood fence following significant storms. Check for damage and ensure the posts are still level by running a piece of string along the tops. Look for dips or rises in the string, and examine those posts to see if repairs are needed. Making structural repairs now will prevent the damage from worsening throughout the winter.
— Routinely clean your fence of leaves or other organic matter that has settled on the rails or become lodged between boards.
— Keep the cement footings clear of dirt, bark dust or other matter. This may seem counterintuitive, but doing so reduces the likelihood that the cement will become cracked by trapped moisture or changes in temperature.
–If possible, promptly replace any boards that have been damaged.
Like the rest of the yard, a wood fence can easily become neglected during the winter months. By keeping up on these basic maintenance practices, however, you can minimize winter damage to your fence and prevent further problems in the spring.…

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Installing

How To Protect Wooden Fence

How To Protect Wooden Fence

Staining your How To Protect Wooden Fence or deck can be a hair-tearing affair if not done properly. It’s frustrating to brush on a deck or fence stain only to find out it was applied unevenly, or that previous blemishes in the wood continue to show through. For best results when staining a wood deck or fence, it’s important to first ensure that the wood is as clean as possible so that the stain penetrates evenly.

A carefully chosen Toe Nailing Fence Rails or deck brightener with oxalic acid can help achieve this goal, yet many homeowners skip this important step when applying How To Protect Wooden Fence or deck stain. Here’s a primer on what to look for in a wood brightener and how to use it.

What is oxalic acid?

Oxalic acid is the primary ingredient in brighteners for cedar decks and fences. It’s often used by professional contractors before a refinishing project to:
Remove unsightly blemishes. Leaves, twigs and other organic matter that lands on your fence rails or deck surface can “bleed” onto the wood, leaving tannin stains. A wood brightener gets rid of these, as well as any mildew or rust stains.

Improve stain penetration

The most important goal when staining a wood fence or deck is to allow the stain to permeate the wood as much as possible. The better the penetration, the longer the stain will last and the more protection it will provide. Too much moisture in the wood can hinder this process. Using a wood brightener before you stain will open up the pores of the wood and allow more stain to seep in.

Restore the appearance of old, weathered wood. Stain doesn’t cover the wood like paint; it only enhances what’s already there. The better the initial surface looks, the better the finished surface will look. A fence or deck brightener will give you a better-looking surface to start out with.

Neutralize stain remover. If your fence or deck restoration project requires a stain or seal remover to get rid of past layers, the remover can darken the wood and even weaken subsequent stain coatings. A good cleaning with oxalic acid not only brightens up the wood again, but it neutralizes the stain remover so it won’t affect your new coat of stain.

Should I use a wood brightener on a new fence or deck?

The fresh wood of a new How To Protect Wooden Fence or deck may not need brightening, but it still needs prep work before you stain it. New wood can contain “mill scale,” a flaky surface of iron oxide, hematite and magnetite, which can lead to a blotchy stain job. Applying oxalic acid will both clean the new wood and make it more receptive to staining.

How do I use a wood brightener?

Before applying the product, clean off as much surface dirt as possible by hosing, power washing (carefully) or scrubbing with a mild detergent. Then simply spray the brightener on with a garden sprayer, let it sit for 15-20 minutes and rinse; no scrubbing is required. Follow the manufacturer’s recommendations for whatever product you’re using.

What do I do after I apply the brightener?

After rinsing off the brightener, you’ll need to allow your fence or deck to dry thoroughly, which takes about 2-3 days in warm, sunny weather. To be certain your deck is dry enough, you can use a moisture meter, a nail-like device that’s tapped into the end of a board. The wood is ready for staining when the moisture level reaches about 18 percent.
Skipping these steps and going straight to staining your fence or deck is not a wise maneuver. However, by taking your time, using a wood brightener and taking the proper precautions, you will be able to produce a quality stain job that will protect the wood from sun and rain.
~Ben Anton, 2010…