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Repairing

Life Expectancy Of Cedar Fence

Life Expectancy Of Cedar Fence

In addition to the typical concerns for would-be fence builders Life Expectancy Of Cedar Fence, home owners in the Pacific Northwest must consider the region’s wet climate. The area’s lush flora is supported by rains that can fall for more than half the year. Ideally, then, a fence would be attractive, low-maintenance, and durable enough to stand up to the Northwest’s mixture of rain, sleet, hail, and hot summer sun (sometimes, all in one day!).

Despite the fact that low-maintenance vinyl fencing is available in many styles, most Northwesterners continue to choose cedar for their fence materials. Life Expectancy Of Cedar Fence. Here are some of the benefits that make cedar the #1 choice for fencing material in the Pacific Northwest.

Environmentally Sound

By purchasing cedar Temporary Fencing Ideas material, Northwesterners are choosing to support local value and efficiency. Buying local cedar also benefits the environment: Because cedar is a native tree species, transportation and energy costs are much lower compared to many other fence materials.

Local Tradition

Many desire a look and feel for their home that fits in with the local history. This is why Northwesterners often choose to build with cedar. Indigenous tribes in the Pacific Northwest highly valued cedar; one native name for the species translates to “Tree of Life”. Life Expectancy Of Cedar Fence. It was used in nearly everything from clothing to construction to cooking. Homeowners that choose to build a cedar fence are honoring the area’s history with this material.

Considering that Pacific Northwest cedar is considered some of the finest in the world, it’s easy to understand why Northwest homeowners prefer to use it when building their fences. Four major species of cedar thrive in the Pacific Northwest: Alaskan Cedar, Port Orford Cedar, Incense Cedar, and the Western Red Cedar. As far as durability and affordability are concerned, many consider Western Red the best choice for cedar fence material. Pacific Northwest homes most often use Western Red for their cedar fences.

Resistance to Damp Weather

The Northwest’s propensity for wetness requires pickiness when it comes to choosing a cedar fence material. For this reason, cedar is a good choice for its unique weather resistance, especially its ability to withstand heavy rains.

Cedar fence materials are hygroscopic, meaning they take in or release moisture along with the surrounding atmosphere. This ability to “breathe” in moisture means cedar is less likely to warp in wet climates. Cedar also contains a natural insect repellant, and is therefore naturally protected against native insect infestations and fungal rot as well.
Workability

Although it’s 80% as strong as oak, cedar is considered a soft wood. That softness, combined with cedar’s uniform fine, straight grain makes it easier to work with. Cedar is also easy to stain and seal because it has very little pitch or resin; this creates a perfect surface for bonding with stains and sealants.

While there are many great low-maintenance fencing materials on the market, such as chain-link fencing and vinyl fencing, none can beat the popularity of cedar fence material. Cedar fences are durable, gorgeous, and a natural choice for the Northwest, with its lush native cedar trees.
Ambiance

Cedar has a rich, natural color that compliments the natural scenery. For this reason, it looks at home with many different landscaping schemes and home designs. Cedar also exudes a fresh, natural scent that many associate with the Northwest’s pristine wilderness.…

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Installing

How To Protect Wooden Fence

How To Protect Wooden Fence

Staining your How To Protect Wooden Fence or deck can be a hair-tearing affair if not done properly. It’s frustrating to brush on a deck or fence stain only to find out it was applied unevenly, or that previous blemishes in the wood continue to show through. For best results when staining a wood deck or fence, it’s important to first ensure that the wood is as clean as possible so that the stain penetrates evenly.

A carefully chosen Toe Nailing Fence Rails or deck brightener with oxalic acid can help achieve this goal, yet many homeowners skip this important step when applying How To Protect Wooden Fence or deck stain. Here’s a primer on what to look for in a wood brightener and how to use it.

What is oxalic acid?

Oxalic acid is the primary ingredient in brighteners for cedar decks and fences. It’s often used by professional contractors before a refinishing project to:
Remove unsightly blemishes. Leaves, twigs and other organic matter that lands on your fence rails or deck surface can “bleed” onto the wood, leaving tannin stains. A wood brightener gets rid of these, as well as any mildew or rust stains.

Improve stain penetration

The most important goal when staining a wood fence or deck is to allow the stain to permeate the wood as much as possible. The better the penetration, the longer the stain will last and the more protection it will provide. Too much moisture in the wood can hinder this process. Using a wood brightener before you stain will open up the pores of the wood and allow more stain to seep in.

Restore the appearance of old, weathered wood. Stain doesn’t cover the wood like paint; it only enhances what’s already there. The better the initial surface looks, the better the finished surface will look. A fence or deck brightener will give you a better-looking surface to start out with.

Neutralize stain remover. If your fence or deck restoration project requires a stain or seal remover to get rid of past layers, the remover can darken the wood and even weaken subsequent stain coatings. A good cleaning with oxalic acid not only brightens up the wood again, but it neutralizes the stain remover so it won’t affect your new coat of stain.

Should I use a wood brightener on a new fence or deck?

The fresh wood of a new How To Protect Wooden Fence or deck may not need brightening, but it still needs prep work before you stain it. New wood can contain “mill scale,” a flaky surface of iron oxide, hematite and magnetite, which can lead to a blotchy stain job. Applying oxalic acid will both clean the new wood and make it more receptive to staining.

How do I use a wood brightener?

Before applying the product, clean off as much surface dirt as possible by hosing, power washing (carefully) or scrubbing with a mild detergent. Then simply spray the brightener on with a garden sprayer, let it sit for 15-20 minutes and rinse; no scrubbing is required. Follow the manufacturer’s recommendations for whatever product you’re using.

What do I do after I apply the brightener?

After rinsing off the brightener, you’ll need to allow your fence or deck to dry thoroughly, which takes about 2-3 days in warm, sunny weather. To be certain your deck is dry enough, you can use a moisture meter, a nail-like device that’s tapped into the end of a board. The wood is ready for staining when the moisture level reaches about 18 percent.
Skipping these steps and going straight to staining your fence or deck is not a wise maneuver. However, by taking your time, using a wood brightener and taking the proper precautions, you will be able to produce a quality stain job that will protect the wood from sun and rain.
~Ben Anton, 2010…