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Lowes Composite Fencing

Lowes Composite Fencing

Are you considering adding a Lowes Composite Fencing to your home? If so, there are at least five elements you’ll want to consider: purpose and style, the materials, needed documentation and regulations, the installation itself, and maintenance afterwards. This tutorial focuses on residential fencing, not fencing for commercial or agricultural purposes.

Purpose of your new Fence

There are many reasons why homeowners add Lowes Composite Fencing to their property. Often, they want some level of added privacy, or intend to limit neighbors and passers by from walking on their property. Safety and security of children and pets is often the primary motivator to start a fencing project. There are a huge amount of styles and sizes of fencing in many materials and colors that can satisfy your specific needs and wants in fencing. Usually, the reasons why you want a fence in the first place will lead you to the style that best meets your specific purposes.

Fencing Materials

Lowes Composite Fencing Materials are usually wood, metal, vinyl or some composite of vinyl and wood together. With most styles of fencing that you choose, you’ll then have the option of the actual material that will be used in it’s construction.

Two of the most popular woods used in residential fencing are pine and cedar. You’ll hear the expression ‘pressure treated pine’ used often, but realize that process does not exempt the wood from potential damage from insects or weather. Pressure treating will help limit the breakdown of the wood, but additional sealers and periodic painting or staining are needed to extend the fence’s lifespan and keep it’s appearance from deteriorating. In almost any neighborhood, you can see fencing that has a driftwood gray hue. That’s pressure treated pine that wasn’t sealed and painter (or stained) after installation. Ideally, you’ll seal your pine fencing and then paint or stain it every two years or as needed.

Cedar’s a popular option

Cedar’s a popular option because it’s more durable than pine and it looks great. But even with a cedar fence, be sure to seal it after installation. You’ll see a lot of pine and cedar used in residential fencing with the exception of split rail fencing, which uses harder woods like locust and hemlock. Woods are used in almost every style of fencing, from a small picket to a very tall privacy fence.

Usually, if a residential fence is made of metal, you can bet it’s probably a Chain Link style. With chain link fencing, the posts, brackets and the actual chain links are all galvanized metal to retard rusting. Many people wouldn’t consider chain link outside of an urban setting, but others find it to be an inexpensive option per foot. In the past decade, there’s been a trend to coat the chain link and the posts with colored vinyl to weatherproof it. This not only extends it’s already long life expectancy but it also can dramatically improve it’s appearance. A

Chain link fence requires little routine maintenance.

Synthetic materials have been gaining in popularity because they are fundamentally maintenance free. As technology has improved, so has their durability and resemblance to real wood products. Synthetic fencing comes in numerous styles, colors and textures, and is virtually maintenance free. But also look at the thickness of the products which can vary greatly. Lower grade vinyl fencing can be more likely to crack or break if accidentally hit with an object. More premium grades are much more durable and should come with great warranties.

When the manufacturer combines synthetic materials with wood particles to create a hybrid between the two, it’s called a Composite. Be sure that your Lowes Split Rail Fence Cost Builder is clear about the components of the proposed fence. Is it all vinyl or a composite? And is it premium or builder’s grade? With synthetics and composites, it’s best to see an actual sample rather than relying on a picture, so you can feel the texture and density yourself.

Documentation and Regulations Before beginning a project, you need to know what limitations are imposed by your local government or Home Owners Association. Usually, a developed community will have written standards as to what is and is not allowed. Your HOA or local city or county government will have these guidelines, and tell you if there is a formal permitting process for prior approval. It’s common to gain written pre-approval after submitting a plan that details the location, layout, size and materials.

If the permit application asks for a Property Plat of your property, that is often found in your settlement documents or at the municipalities tax or records departments. Many Fence Contractors include the Permitting in their cost estimates. And be sure they are the ones who are responsible to call the Utility company, …

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Steel

Types Of Post And Rail Fence

Types Of Post And Rail Fence

All about Types Of Post And Rail Fence. For several years I have stood by and watched my family’s bicycles get dropped around the house. I’ve bruised myself carrying bikes up and down the basement stairs and what’s worse is several bikes haven’t made it into the house. They have been stolen. This year was going to be different. I decided I was finally going to build a permanent center for bicycle parking in the backyard. But how would I build it? What would I use? I don’t tend to decide things quickly and over a period of a month or so, I thought about what would be the most economical and yet solid approach to the problem. I came up with a solution and, as is often the case, the answer to this problem turned out to be a useful approach to several outdoor building projects.

Galvanized Fence Post

One afternoon, I was riding my bike down the road. I looked over and there it was. The solution to my bike parking problem. Types Of Post And Rail Fence is made of three main components. The posts and rails (which run vertically and horizontally) and the meshing. The posts and rails come in a few standard sizes. They’re Types Of Fence and very strong, galvanized for weather proofing and, because they’re mass-produced, they’re quite inexpensive. A typical 8 foot long x 2 7/8″ steel post costs between $10 and $15.00. A 10 foot long x 1 7/8″ horizontal rail costs about the same. Galvanized fencing is such an obvious structural mainstay for fencing, it would have to work as a bike rack.

Rail Structures

I thought about it for another couple of weeks and then one day, I rounded up the kids and we went to the local building center to pick up some supplies. The design I decided on was very simple to start with. Two fence posts (2 7/8″ diameter x 8 feet tall) with top caps and two bags of concrete mix were purchased. The kids and I loaded the posts and cement into the van and headed for home. I was amazed at how little time it took to put the project together and how well it worked.

We dug two holes, about 18 inches deep, five feet from each other. We then positioned the two posts with caps on top — one in the middle of each hole. We then poured the cement mix around the posts and leveled them up. We let the posts sit for the night and the next morning we had our bike rack ready for parking. With this simple little project, bikes are directed right toward the posts. I really like the idea of leaving the posts at the height they are with no cross rail. this simple design causes little obstruction and allows for a free flow of people through the area that the bikes are locked up in. Now I am considering adding a horizontal cross member at about 4 feet. I would have to cut off the two vertical posts at about 4 feet and weld or bolt a horizontal rail.

This would stop any attempt to raise the bikes up over the top of the posts. I am also considering adding a roof to protect the bikes from the elements. The roof would be made from, guess what? Two 10 foot lengths of fence rail, cut with a pipe cutter and welded together with a sheet of fiberglass panel bolted to it.

I am also considering setting up a shelving unit around the barbecue made from Types Of Post And Rail Fence, an awning to shade the patio and who knows, a bike trailer to carry things to and from the store in.
But, those projects may or may not happen. For now, I’ve got the bikes up off the ground and a whole new array of building materials for whatever outdoor projects I dream up in the months and years ahead.…

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Split

The Best Inexpensive Fencing Ideas

Inexpensive Fencing IdeasĀ 

All about inexpensive fencing ideas. People who choose to purchase steel garden and driveway gates, or iron railings to surround their home are often looking to make a statement rather than merely secure the perimeter of their property. And the type of materials chosen invariably end up making a statement about the people doing the purchasing.

Materials range from fabricated metals to cast iron and wrought iron but there is a false economy to beware of when making a decision. And that is, long term ownership costs. Materials age differently, with some being more resistant to corrosion, so any purchasing decision regarding such ornamental Inexpensive Fencing IdeasĀ  must be made with this is mind. If there’s is no intention to stay at a property long term so the collateral damage to the fencing ten years down the line is irrelevant, then, by all means, go solely for cost and appearance. This is about Inexpensive Privacy Fence Ideas.

Factors in Choosing Iron Fencing

However, if the intention is to stay in a property long term, then durability needs to be a key factor is selecting iron gates and fencing. Fabricated metals tend to be shorter lived, whereas cast iron fencing and gates are generally considered to have a lifespan of 100 years plus.
However, note the stress on ‘real’. Anyone considering wrought iron for their ornamental Inexpensive Fencing Ideas needs to make sure it is real and not mild steel made many times over.

About Iron Fencing

Anyone who lives in a historic city or town will have witnessed the endurance of cast and wrought iron fencing. Which you can usually maintain a level of grandeur despite being exposed to the elements for many years. This is why such materials are often deployed for iron fencing and gates adorning public buildings such as universities, museums and parks.

Anyone environmentally conscious, should veer towards cast iron and real wrought iron for fencing. This is recyclable so reduces the carbon emissions used in having to constantly manufacture new steel fencing. Clearly, cost is a key factor. The inferior materials used in many iron gates and fencing mean they come cheaper. Whereas long term ownership value is greater with more expensive cast iron and real wrought iron gates and fencing.

Ultimately, it’s a decision predicated on personal circumstance, environmental awareness and historic appreciation. Designs modelled on original 19th century designs tend come from the heritage side of iron gates and fencing. Which primarily deploys traditional materials such as cast iron and real wrought iron.…