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Wood

How To Prevent Wood Fence From Turning Gray

How To Prevent Wood Fence From Turning Gray

How To Prevent Wood Fence From Turning Gray is most important. Depending on the type of fence you need, will determine what wood fence panels will be required. There are hundreds of options when it comes to fencing. Just knowing that you want a wooden fence will narrow down your choices greatly.

Choosing the Right Wood Fence Panels

If your fence is for agricultural use, you are probably less concerned with its aesthetic. This will be a fence for function. Most often these fences come in a 2-rail, 3-rail, or stacked fencing variety. There are many different How To Prevent Wood Fence From Turning Gray that can be used for agricultural fencing.

For residential fencing there are many more options. There are lots of decorative and stylistic features that you would not necessarily find with agricultural fencing. Sizing is one of the main differences. If the residential fencing is for decorative purposes and not for functional needs, there is almost an unending variety of choices in wood fence panels.

Privacy fencing can be used in either residential or agricultural needs. Plain and dog eared picket Styles Of Wood Fences posts and panels are the most popular in wooden fencing for privacy. They also add a bit of security. Even with privacy fencing it is possible to have style. You might want to keep a view hidden, but you can still enjoy the interior space that you have created. There are many ways to do this with fencing.

When you have the How To Prevent Wood Fence From Turning Gray panels that you need, the next step is to get all the tools for putting the fence together. You will need to have a level to make sure the posts are in evenly. A post hole digger or auger to create the holes for the fence posts. A tamp bar to help push down the dirt around the posts. And lastly a sledge hammer and a hammer, for the actual labor of pounding in the fence posts and hammering on the wood fence panels. Each of these tools will be very valuable in getting your fence installed correctly.…

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Steel

Vinyl Privacy Fence

Vinyl Privacy Fence

Most Vinyl Privacy Fence are about six feet tall, but there are many varieties of fencing available. If you want to make your outdoor area more secluded, or want to block out a harsh view, getting a vinyl privacy fence might be the best solution.

Often people will put Vinyl Privacy Fence around one specific area of their yard. If one spot is viewable from the neighbors house, or there is a favorite place you want to be able to relax without prying eyes, putting fencing just around that area can often do the trick.

Choosing the Right Vinyl Privacy Fence

Most towns and cities will have specific zoning requirements about privacy fencing. So, before you run out and install fencing all along your house, make sure you are meeting the requirements. If you put in Vinyl Privacy Fence that does not meet zoning specifics, you will get fined and most likely, have to take it down. This can be an expense in itself! Zoning can affect the height, the material, and the location of fencing allowed around your home.

Vinyl privacy fencing can be difficult to install. There are several factors that have to be taken into consideration that don’t necessarily apply to wood fencing. With Types Of Fence, weather is a factor. Heat and cold will cause the fence to expand and contract. Make sure that this is thought of during the installation process. Wind can easily knock down a privacy fence that is not installed properly. Make sure that your posts are at least two feet into the soil. If you are in a high wind area, consider going deeper.

A great tip for vinyl privacy fence installation is to do a test run. Put in some sticks and run white sheets between them. Do this exercise on a mellow weather day. Leave this test fence up for a few days and see what happens. How do you like the view of this fence? Would you rather block out a different area? Move your fence around to make sure you get the privacy you really want.…

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Steel

Types Of Post And Rail Fence

Types Of Post And Rail Fence

All about Types Of Post And Rail Fence. For several years I have stood by and watched my family’s bicycles get dropped around the house. I’ve bruised myself carrying bikes up and down the basement stairs and what’s worse is several bikes haven’t made it into the house. They have been stolen. This year was going to be different. I decided I was finally going to build a permanent center for bicycle parking in the backyard. But how would I build it? What would I use? I don’t tend to decide things quickly and over a period of a month or so, I thought about what would be the most economical and yet solid approach to the problem. I came up with a solution and, as is often the case, the answer to this problem turned out to be a useful approach to several outdoor building projects.

Galvanized Fence Post

One afternoon, I was riding my bike down the road. I looked over and there it was. The solution to my bike parking problem. Types Of Post And Rail Fence is made of three main components. The posts and rails (which run vertically and horizontally) and the meshing. The posts and rails come in a few standard sizes. They’re Types Of Fence and very strong, galvanized for weather proofing and, because they’re mass-produced, they’re quite inexpensive. A typical 8 foot long x 2 7/8″ steel post costs between $10 and $15.00. A 10 foot long x 1 7/8″ horizontal rail costs about the same. Galvanized fencing is such an obvious structural mainstay for fencing, it would have to work as a bike rack.

Rail Structures

I thought about it for another couple of weeks and then one day, I rounded up the kids and we went to the local building center to pick up some supplies. The design I decided on was very simple to start with. Two fence posts (2 7/8″ diameter x 8 feet tall) with top caps and two bags of concrete mix were purchased. The kids and I loaded the posts and cement into the van and headed for home. I was amazed at how little time it took to put the project together and how well it worked.

We dug two holes, about 18 inches deep, five feet from each other. We then positioned the two posts with caps on top — one in the middle of each hole. We then poured the cement mix around the posts and leveled them up. We let the posts sit for the night and the next morning we had our bike rack ready for parking. With this simple little project, bikes are directed right toward the posts. I really like the idea of leaving the posts at the height they are with no cross rail. this simple design causes little obstruction and allows for a free flow of people through the area that the bikes are locked up in. Now I am considering adding a horizontal cross member at about 4 feet. I would have to cut off the two vertical posts at about 4 feet and weld or bolt a horizontal rail.

This would stop any attempt to raise the bikes up over the top of the posts. I am also considering adding a roof to protect the bikes from the elements. The roof would be made from, guess what? Two 10 foot lengths of fence rail, cut with a pipe cutter and welded together with a sheet of fiberglass panel bolted to it.

I am also considering setting up a shelving unit around the barbecue made from Types Of Post And Rail Fence, an awning to shade the patio and who knows, a bike trailer to carry things to and from the store in.
But, those projects may or may not happen. For now, I’ve got the bikes up off the ground and a whole new array of building materials for whatever outdoor projects I dream up in the months and years ahead.…